Kortijos (cortejos) were the dwellings carrying the architectural characteristics brought to Izmir by the Sephardic Jews as they migrated from the Iberian Peninsula to the Ottoman Empire. Surrounded by the high walls of a two-storied building, the rooms of a kortijo would be facing a courtyard with a faucet or well, serving like a common guest room.

 

Kurtuluş Mah., Anafartalar Cad., Konak – İzmir

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  • Documents tell us we that the Jewish cemetery already existed in the 13th century in the mountain named Montjuic, in the north of the city, between two streams, in the middle of the current districts of Pedret and Pont Major. In the late 19th century, due to the construction of the railway line which had to link Girona to the French border, the first gravestones with Jewish inscriptions appeared. The Museum of Jewish History displays a unique collection of Hebrew gravestones dated back to the 12th and 15th centuries, from the cemetery of Montjuic and recovered from different places of the city since the 19th century.
  • The excavations carried out at Bonastruc ça Porta Center (2012/2013) to enable a space for temporary exhibitions discovered the remains of a Jewish house built in the 13th century. At the end of the 14th century it suffered a fire, and in the 15th century, it was reused as a Jewish butcher shop, part of the complex of the synagogue, until 1492. A few years later it was demolished and turned into a courtyard where in 19th and 20th c. they built new walls and sewers.
  • Documents tell us we that the Jewish cemetery already existed in the 13th century in the mountain named Montjuic, in the north of the city, between two streams, in the middle of the current districts of Pedret and Pont Major. In the late 19th century, due to the construction of the railway line which had to link Girona to the French border, the first gravestones with Jewish inscriptions appeared. The Museum of Jewish History displays a unique collection of Hebrew gravestones dated back to the 12th and 15th centuries, from the cemetery of Montjuic and recovered from different places of the city since the 19th century.
  • Documents tell us we that the Jewish cemetery already existed in the 13th century in the mountain named Montjuic, in the north of the city, between two streams, in the middle of the current districts of Pedret and Pont Major. In the late 19th century, due to the construction of the railway line which had to link Girona to the French border, the first gravestones with Jewish inscriptions appeared. The Museum of Jewish History displays a unique collection of Hebrew gravestones dated back to the 12th and 15th centuries, from the cemetery of Montjuic and recovered from different places of the city since the 19th century.
  • Documents tell us we that the Jewish cemetery already existed in the 13th century in the mountain named Montjuic, in the north of the city, between two streams, in the middle of the current districts of Pedret and Pont Major. In the late 19th century, due to the construction of the railway line which had to link Girona to the French border, the first gravestones with Jewish inscriptions appeared. The Museum of Jewish History displays a unique collection of Hebrew gravestones dated back to the 12th and 15th centuries, from the cemetery of Montjuic and recovered from different places of the city since the 19th century.
  • One of the most emblematic streets in Girona and centre of the call (medieval Jewish quarter) in the 15th century. At the same entrance of Sant Llorenç street from Força street, it is still possible to locate the hinges of the old gate which kept these steps closed until 1975. In the middle of its steep steps was the gate which led , via an access of courtyards and porches, to the building which housed the last Synagogue in the 15th century, today part of the Museum of Jewish History.
  • The main thoroughfare of the medieval city and the call (medieval Jewish quarter), also corresponds to the Roman cardus and via Augusta and it takes its name from the fortress which Girona represents. In 1373 it already was the centre of the call, known as Carrer Major del Call On its Western side the call opened out into narrow, steep streets like that of Lluis Batlle street, ancient Synagogue street, Hernández street or Cúndaro street, or the upper stretch of Força street which received the street name Carrer Major del Call Judaic or Mercadell since a medieval market was located at the end of it. At the end of the 14th century this street was declared by the Christian authorities to be a forbidden space to Jews and was renamed Sant Llorenç street.
  • One of the most emblematic streets in Girona and centre of the call (medieval Jewish quarter) in the 15th century. At the same entrance of Sant Llorenç street from Força street, it is still possible to locate the hinges of the old gate which kept these steps closed until 1975. In the middle of its steep steps was the gate which led , via an access of courtyards and porches, to the building which housed the last Synagogue in the 15th century, today part of the Museum of Jewish History.
  • Casa Adret is considered to be the oldest home in the city of Barcelona, and up until the late 14th century belonged to one of the many Jewish families of the old Jewish quarter in which it still stands. Nowadays it has become a center for the promotion and celebration of Jewish culture in all its facets.
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