Mini street spectacle Jewish Life in Ljubljana

We will start the core programon on 30 and 31 August, when we will stage a street performance, a mini spectacle Jewish Life in Ljubljana, on the street in front of our centre. I have prepared the script and the text together with the extremely prolific Slovenian writer and director Vink Moederndorfer and condensed it into 8 pictures. The play was directed by the Israeli director Yonatan Esterkin. The play was co-produced last year with the Yiddish Theatre of Tel Aviv and features three Israeli actors, four from Slovenia and five musicians. Before World War II, quite a few Jewish families lived in Ljubljana, although the community was relatively small and numbered less than 200 people. They had their own customs, their own habits. People of Jewish origin also lived in Križevniška Street. As in many streets of our city. They have lived here since ancient times. They lived peacefully. They were doctors, students, merchants, shoemakers, bankers, builders, lawyers, … They married among themselves, as well as outside their families and religion. They cultivated their own customs. Sometimes more openly, sometimes more covertly, depending on the time, politics and social mood. After the occupation of Yugoslavia in 1941, the situation worsened even for the Jews on Slovenian soil. Otherwise, less than a thousand believers professed the Jewish faith on the territory of the pre-war Drava Banovina, most of them in Prekmurje. Jews were most persecuted by the German occupier in their occupied territory in Styria and Gorenje, while the Italian and Hungarian occupiers took a more lenient stance, especially towards Jews who had already lived in the occupied area before the Second World War. When the Italians occupied Ljubljana, many young Jews worked with the Liberation Front. More than many Slovenians, Jewish families were aware of the danger of fascism and Nazism. Very soon, however, bans for Jewish residents appeared in Ljubljana as well. The Pollak, Ebenspanger, Bolaffio, Silberstein, Steinberg, Baumgarten, Moskovič, Kapper, Lorant, Goldstein, Oblat,… In the street play-performance Jewish life in Ljubljana, for which the script and text were prepared by Robert Waltl and Vinko Möderndorfer, actors from the Mini Theater Ljubljana (Tadej Pišek, Timotej Novaković, Barbara Vidovič and Nika Korenjak) and the Yiddishpiel Theater from Tel Aviv ( Nathan Hecht, Omer Rozenblum and Hanna Hill), who, under the direction of the well-known Israeli director Yonatan Estrkin, presented to the Slovenian audience in eight pictures a fragment of pre-war Jewish life in Ljubljana with Jewish customs and celebrations, as well as the occupation and the Holocaust period in Ljubljana, when the native Jews were first joined by thousands of refugees, first from Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland, and after 1941, mainly by hundreds of Croatian Jews who were persecuted by the NDH and who found a temporary safe haven in Ljubljana. Through the pictures, the performance then led us through the persecution of Ljubljana’s Jews and deportations to extermination camps, to their participation in the Liberation Front and partisan units. Everything was connected by Jewish music, which was performed live by the musicians of the Kletzmer Trio. The play is performed in Slovenian, Hebrew and Yiddish.

04/07/2023

Jewish Life in Ljubljana

Mini street spectacle Jewish Life in Ljubljana

We will start the core programon on 30 and 31 August, when we will stage a street performance, a mini spectacle Jewish Life in Ljubljana, on the street in front of our centre. I have prepared the script and the text together with the extremely prolific Slovenian writer and director Vink Moederndorfer and condensed it into 8 pictures. The play was directed by the Israeli director Yonatan Esterkin. The play was co-produced last year with the Yiddish Theatre of Tel Aviv and features three Israeli actors, four from Slovenia and five musicians. Before World War II, quite a few Jewish families lived in Ljubljana, although the community was relatively small and numbered less than 200 people.

04/07/2023

Opening of the exhibition Jewish Soldiers of The Austro-Hungarian Empire on the Isonzo Front

Opening of the exhibition Jewish Soldiers of The Austro-Hungarian Empire on the Isonzo Front
In 2024, we will commemorate the centenary of the start of the First World War.
Twenty years later, the Second World War followed, so the first has not been treated to the extent that would have been important and necessary. As many Jews lived in Prekmurje at the turn of the 19th century, they also had to go to war: some of them became officers. The data on them is not yet definitive and is also unreliable, so we do not know how many of them were victims or how many died.The First World War involved no less than 36 countries. The bloody fighting at the Battle of Isonzo (1915-1917) thus bore a multinational as well as a multi-religious stamp.

04/07/2023

Opening of the first permanent exhibition on the Holocaust – Holocaust in Ljubljana

Opening of the first permanent exhibition on the Holocaust – Holocaust in Ljubljana- 1.9.2023
On Friday, 1 September at 6 pm, the President of the Republic of Slovenia, Mrs Nataša Pirc Musar, will open the first permanent exhibition on the Holocaust – Holocaust in Ljubljana, which is being prepared by the Jewish Cultural Centre Ljubljana and the Ljubljana City Museum.
The exhibition is curated by Dr Blaž Vurnik and designed by visual artists Miran Mohar and Vadim Fishkin.
Their new installation “Amsterdam”, dedicated to the Slovenian victims of the Holocaust, will also be on display on this occasion.

The evening will continue with a Shabbat service led by our Rabbi Alexander Grodensky and Cantor Nikola David. In the evening, there will also be a special ceremony on our street, with a rich programme including a puppet show for the youngest children, A Visit to the Sun, and a concert by the Anbot group with klezmer and Ladino music.

04/07/2023

European Day of Jewish Culture in Istambul 2023

The European Day of Jewish Culture will be held on 12 November 2023 at the Quincentennial Foundation Museum of Turkish Jews and the adjacent Neve Şalom Synagogue. Held in Turkey since 2001, the EDJC will introduce the culture and traditions of the Turkish Jews with a series of events – lectures, exhibitions, documentary films, concerts, tours – this year within the framework of the « Memory » theme.

The Turkish Jewish Community has been living in the territory of Turkey for centuries and on this day visitors will be able to learn more about its culture, the vanishing language Judeo-Espanyol (Ladino), Sephardic dishes, concerts, talks, movie displays, and stories. The main purpose of the day is to introduce the cultural and historical heritage of Turkish Jews, as well as to share their traditional music and arts with the people of their country.

03/07/2023

Concert du Jak & Janet Esim Quintet (Istanbul)

Jak & Janet Esim sont des pionniers de la recherche et de l’interprétation du répertoire musical judéo-espagnol. Ils n’ont eu de cesse depuis les années 1970 de recueillir des chants sépharades tant auprès de leur communauté d’origine à Istanbul que dans les autres communautés de Turquie ou de la diaspora. Ils ont partagé cette musique avec leurs auditeurs, par le biais d’albums et lors de nombreux concerts et festivals avec toujours une grande fidélité à leur héritage.

À l’heure où ce répertoire connaît un succès qui ne se dément pas, leur venue en France sera un événement et une occasion de révéler leur parcours au public français et la richesse du répertoire sépharade issu de l’ancien Empire ottoman.

Les membres du quintet sont Janet Esim Erpalaçi (chant), Jak Esim (chant et guitare), Yusuf Esim Erpalaçi (chant et guitare), Bekir Şahin Baloğlu (oud), Oral Yay (percussion).

03/07/2023

Lecture bilingue (yiddish-français) de “La plus précieuse des marchandises” de Jean-Claude Grumberg

La plus précieuse des marchandises de Jean-Claude Grumberg (éditions du Seuil, La Librairie du XXIe siècle, 2019)
Traduit dans de très nombreuses langues, ce conte, où un paquet précipité d’un train précipite à son tour le Génocide juif dans l’intemporel et l’universel, n’attendait plus que sa traduction en yiddish. C’est désormais chose faite.

la Maison de la culture yiddish présente la lecture bilingue de ce livre majeur traduit par Yitskhok Niborski.
On a souvent dit que dans l’écriture de Jean-Claude Grumberg résonnent les échos de la langue yiddish. On ignore souvent que nombre d’œuvres de la littérature mondiale ont été traduites en yiddish. La traduction en yiddish de La Plus Précieuse des marchandises continue une longue tradition littéraire, entretenant le dialogue fertile entre deux langues, deux traductions du monde, si éloignées et si proches.

03/07/2023

« C’était un samedi, c’était shabbat, le 25 mars 1944, à Ioannina »

« C’était un samedi, c’était shabbat, le 25 mars 1944, à Ioannina »

Passant des souvenirs du grand écrivain grec, Dimitris Haddis, aux témoignages des survivants qu’elle tisse de chants judéo-grecs ou judéo-espagnols, la metteure en scène, Irène Bonnaud, raconte, par la voix de l’actrice et chanteuse Fotini Banou, le sort tragique de cette communauté mais aussi sa vie et sa culture. Le destin du convoi grec du printemps 1944, c’est pourtant aussi « l’affaire Kurt Waldheim », les quatre photos prises par Alberto Errera à Birkenau, le manuscrit enterré de Marcel Nadjari, la révolte du Sonderkommando le 7 octobre 1944 – un samedi aussi.
Entourée par de fascinantes figurines créées par la sculptrice Clio Makris, Fotini Banou, avec tendresse et ténacité, dit le deuil d’un monde disparu, mais aussi la résistance.

03/07/2023

MEMOIRE D’INNA SANDLER

La GALERIE SAPHIR présente le projet « Mémoire » d’Inna Sandler.
Le thème « Mémoire » coïncide avec la convention sur le patrimoine culturel immatériel de l’Unesco : chacun de nous porte l’espoir de comprendre et de continuer à faire vivre les patrimoines transmis par notre famille… Nous y recherchons les réponses aux questions sur le sens de la vie.
Le projet « Mémoire » d’Inna Sandler se base sur les images (peintures et installations, accompagnées de textes documentaires et de documents originaux de personnes réelles, ses proches, des membres de sa famille, juifs d’Europe (Ukraine) et d’Asie Centrale… leurs vies, leurs destins individuels s’imbriquent dans la mémoire historique de toute l’Humanité.
L’histoire de l’époque a gravement affecté le sort de chacun d’entre eux depuis la Grande Famine en Ukraine à la dékoulakisation de Joseph Staline, la Seconde Guerre mondiale et la Shoah.

03/07/2023

A table ! Livres à dévorer, cuisines juives à savourer

Dimanche 3 septembre 2023
A table !
Livres à dévorer, cuisines juives à savourer

de 10 heures 30 à 18 heures

Dans le cadre des Journées européennes de la culture juive et du festival Les Traversées du Marais, le mahJ organise une journée consacrée aux traditions culinaires juives.

Au fil des siècles, les cuisines des communautés juives du monde entier se sont nourries des traditions culinaires des lieux et des sociétés d’accueil. Ce précieux héritage s’est transmis de génération en génération et constitue parfois le dernier attachement à l’identité juive et au pays de ses parents. Aujourd’hui, les recettes autrefois réservées au cercle familial inspirent de grands chefs, à Londres, Tel Aviv ou Paris.
Le mahJ vous invite à un voyage au cœur des cuisines juives, de la Jewish street food aux plats de fêtes traditionnels, des borekas à la babka en passant par la dafina, la carpe farcie et la bkeïla.

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